Dr Jon Morgan

Lecturer in Biblical Interpretation and Academic Advisor (Partnerships)

I am primarily interested in how the Bible (particularly the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament) is read and interpreted, and how it is engaged, appropriated, resisted, used and abused in cultural, political and ethical discourse.

 

Telephone:  01244 511089
Email:  jon.morgan@chester.ac.uk

Qualifications

BA (Hons) (Exon), MA (Exon), PhD (Exon)

Overview

Before joining TRS in Chester, I was an Honorary Research Fellow and member of the Centre for Biblical Studies at the University of Manchester, Adjunct Lecturer at Luther King House theological college, and Tutor for the Southern North West Training Partnership. Prior to that, I was an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Exeter and Tutor for the South West Ministry Training Course.

I studied Theology at Exeter as an undergraduate and Masters student, and developed a keen interest in working with the Bible and analysing the techniques and ideologies involved in its interpretation. My doctoral work was part of a large hermeneutics project based in Exeter called the Uses of the Bible in Environmental Ethics (UBEE) project, and my PhD thesis examined the book of Leviticus from an eco-critical perspective.

Having taught in the department in 2012/13 as a Visiting Lecturer, I am delighted to have now joined TRS at Chester as a full-time member of staff.

Teaching

Undergraduate Modules

TH4045 The Bible: Contents and Contexts

TH4046 The Bible: Readers and Perspectives

TH5047 Hebrew Bible: Story and History

TH6054 Where Can Wisdom Be Found? Proverbs, Job and Ecclesiastes

Research

Leviticus and the Priestly tradition

Biblical ritual

Ancient near eastern mythology/demonology

Ecological hermeneutics

The Bible in contemporary cinema

The ideologies of biblical scholarship

 

External Funding:

2007-2010 PhD research funding (full grant) – Arts and Humanities Research Council

Published work

‘Visitors, Gatekeepers and Receptionists: Reflections on the shape of Biblical Studies and the Role of reception history’, in Lyons, John (ed), What is this thing called Reception History?, (London: Continuum, forthcoming).

‘Sacrifice in Leviticus: Eco-Friendly Ritual or Unholy Waste?’, in Horrell, David, Cherryl Hunt, Christopher Southgate and Francesca Stavrakopoulou (eds.), Ecological Hermeneutics: Biblical, Historical, and Theological Perspectives, (London: T&T Clark, 2010) 32-45.

‘Transgressing, Puking, Covenanting: The Character of Land in Leviticus’, Theology, Vol. CXII No. 867, (May/June 2009) 172-80.