Dr Linda O'Neill

Senior Lecturer

Linda’s main teaching areas are in Developmental Psychology, Core Topics in Psychology, Psychological Research Methods and Individual Differences. Her research interests are primarily involved are in Developmental and Clinical Psychology and the application of these psychological theories to the siblings of individuals with disabilities.

Qualifications

Linda was awarded a first class degree in Psychology from the University of Liverpool. Then, after undertaking further study, she was awarded her PhD from the University of Liverpool. In 2006 Linda was awarded the Louise Higgins Psychology Prize and in 2007 she was awarded the University Prize. Linda is a chartered member of the British Psychological Society. She is also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Overview

Linda is the Disability Tutor, Applicant Day academic lead and Schools Liaison officer for the department of Psychology. Linda is also a chartered member of the British Psychological Society. Furthermore, she is currently studying to become a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Contact Details

Tel: 01244 513193

Email: l.oneill@chester.ac.uk

Teaching

Linda’s main teaching area is in Developmental Psychology.  She teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate level, where she is module leader. Linda leads the module for Core Topics in Psychology; this is a level four taught module and covers all areas necessary for the students to acquire BPS accreditation. She also teaches on Psychology of Parenting, the Psychology of Identity, Community and Diversity, Becoming a Psychological Researcher, Child and Adolescent Development and Family Lifestyle and Transition. Linda supervises Dissertation students at Undergraduate and Postgraduate level. Linda has been nominated by the students at the Above and Beyond Awards for the Most Outstanding PAT and the Most Inspiring Lecturer.

Research

Linda’s research examines the long-term effect of disabilities upon adult siblings and the reasons behind the increased propensity of some of these siblings towards anxiety and depression. Perceived parenting, adult attachment styles, personality traits and the impact of different disability types are some of the areas that are explored. This is a relatively understudied area and consequently Linda hopes to recognize potential problematic areas in order to inform future interventions or clinical therapies to try to ensure the future wellbeing of these siblings. She has also recently completed a pedagogic study into the use of an electronic response system (mQlicker) in teaching. Linda primarily uses quantitative research methods. 

Published work

Journal articles

Carroll, J., Kirkham, J., Yilmaz, M., & O’Neill, L. (2015). Enhancing learning and teaching through technology: Promoting student engagement through electronic voting systems using mobile phones. Submitted and under review.

O’Neill, L.P., & Murray, L.E. (2015). Anxiety and depression symptomatology in adult siblings of individuals with different developmental disability diagnoses: Is there a problem? Submitted and under review.

O’Neill, L.P., & Murray, L.M. (2015). Does perceived parenting style mediate the relationship between anxiety and attachment styles in adult siblings of individuals with developmental disabilities? (in prep.).

Conference Papers

O’Neill, L., Carroll, J., Kirkham, J., & Yilmaz, M. (2015). “Students – switch your mobiles on!” Teaching enhancing student engagement. Paper presented at SPE - Staff Conference, University of Chester.

O’Neill, L., Carroll, J., Kirkham, J., & Yilmaz, M. (2014). Enhancing the student experience. Paper presented at HEA Stem Annual Learning and Teaching Conference: Enhancing the STEM Student Journey, Edinburgh.