Dr Katherine Wilson

Senior Lecturer in Medieval History

Qualifications

MA (Glasgow), PGCE (Aberdeen), M.Phil (Glasgow), PhD (Glasgow), Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

Overview

In 2002, I completed an MA in History at the University of Glasgow and then in 2003 a PGCE in secondary History teaching at the University of Aberdeen. I then moved back south to undertake an M. Phil in History and PhD in History at Glasgow University which I completed in 2009.

My doctoral thesis, which was supervised by Professor Graeme Small, focused on the manufacture, circulation and use of Burgundian tapestries in court and city for the period 1363-1500. After being awarded my doctorate I worked as a teaching fellow in Medieval History at St Andrews University 2009-2010, and as a Lecturer in Medieval History at the University of York 2010-2012, before being appointed as lecturer in Medieval History here at Chester in 2012. 

Teaching

I contribute to the teaching and convening of the following undergraduate modules:

  • Europe and the Wider World: Turning Points in History, 1000-2000
  • The Mystery of History
  • Constructing Histories
  • Debates in History
  • Rebellion and Society in the Late Middle Ages
  • A Crade of Capitalism? Commercial and Consumer Revolutions Across Europe 1300-1500
  • Power, Ritual and the State: Court and Cities, 1363-1477

I contribute to the following postgraduate modules:

  • Transformation and Impact: War and Chivalry in the Later Middle Ages
  • The Theory and History of Western Warfare

Research

My research seeks to understand the relationship between social and cultural change, and shifting patterns in the use of material culture in the later Middle Ages. I have worked and published on the social and cultural history of the Burgundian Netherlands and France, particularly examining the material culture of these regions, focusing on the circulation of luxury goods and on the biographies of their producers and consumers.

Research Networks

The Production, Commercialisation and Consumption of Luxury Textiles 1400-1600.

I am the co-organiser (with Dr Bart Lambert) of a research network of scholars from America, Belgium, France, Italy and Austria all of whom are investigating the interdependency of the Low Countries, Italy, and their neighbouring territories in the production, commercialisation and consumption of luxury textiles 1400-1600. The network has resulted in an edited volume with Ashgate Press and several workshops at the University of St Andrews, Ghent University and the European University Institute in Florence.

 

The Mobility of Objects Across Boundaries, 1000-1700 (MOB).

I am the co-organiser (with Dr Leah Clark) of an interdisciplinary research network examining the mobility of objects across and beyond European boundaries during the period (1000-1700). By starting from the objects themselves, we seek to consider the mobility of objects, their flexible and adaptable natures to underline the permeable and impervious character of boundaries. Our network has resulted in a session at the European Social Science History Conference in 2016.

Published work

K. A. Wilson and B. Lambert (eds.), Europe’s Rich Fabric. The Consumption, Commercialisation and Production of Luxury Textiles in Italy, the Low Countries and Neighbouring Territories (Fourteenth-Sixteenth Centuries) (Ashgate Early Modern Series, 2016).

K. A. Wilson and B. Lambert, 'Luxury Textiles in Italy and the Low Countries and Neighbouring Territories (Fourteenth to Sixteenth Centuries): A Conceptual Investigation', in K. A. Wilson and B. Lambert (eds.), Europe’s Rich Fabric. The Consumption, Commercialisation and Production of Luxury Textiles in Italy, the Low Countries and Neighbouring Territories (Fourteenth-Sixteenth Centuries) (Ashgate Early Modern Series, 2016), pp. 1-10.

K. A. Wilson, ''In the chamber, in the garde robe, in the chapel, in a chest' : The possession and uses of luxury textiles. The case of Later Medieval Dijon', in K. A. Wilson and B. Lambert (eds.), Europe’s Rich Fabric. The Consumption, Commercialisation and Production of Luxury Textiles in Italy, the Low Countries and Neighbouring Territories (Fourteenth-Sixteenth Centuries) (Ashgate Early Modern Series, 2016), pp. 11-34.

K. A. Wilson, 'The household inventory as urban 'theatre' in late medieval Burgundy', Social History 40: 3, August (2015), pp. 335-359. Open Access.

K. A. Wilson, ‘Tapestry of the Burgundian Dominions. A complex object’ in T. Hiltman (ed.) La cour de Bourgogne et l’Europe: Le rayonnement et les limites d’un modèle culturel, (Jan Thorbecke Verlag, Ostfildern, 2013), pp. 317-332.

K. A. Wilson, ‘Political tapestries of Philip the Bold and John the Fearless’, in E. J. Anderson and J. Farquhar (eds.) Visible Exports/Imports: New Research on Medieval and Renaissance Art and Culture, (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Cambridge 2012), pp. 145-158.

K. Wilson, ‘Paris, Arras et la Cour : Les tapissiers de Philippe le Hardi et Jean sans Peur. 1363-1419’, Revue du Nord 389 (2011), pp. 11-31.

Forthcoming 

K. A. Wilson, ‘Furnishing the Dukes with a Royal Reputation. The use of chambers and chapels at the Burgundian Court’, in The Interior as Embodiment of Power. The Image of the Prince and its Spatial Setting, 1400-1700 (forthcoming, PALITIUM, 2016-17)

I am currently finishing a monograph which utilizes household inventories and ducal accounts to investigate the social and institutional frameworks driving the production and consumption of tapestries.

K. A. Wilson, Courtly and Urban Tapestries of the Burgundian Dominions, c. 1363-1500: Philip the Bold, John the Fearless and the Inhabitants of Dijon, Douai and Tournai. (Brepols, forthcoming).

Reviews

K. Wilson, Review of Popular Protest in Late Medieval English Towns by Samuel K. Cohn and Douglas Aiton, Social History 38: 4 (2013), pp. 510-542.

K. Wilson, Review of the exhibition, ‘Catherine’s world: devotion, demons and daily life in the 15th century’ held at Museum Het Valkhof, Nijmegen, Renaissance Studies 24: 5 (2010), pp. 752-758.

Blogs 

Social History, K. A. Wilson, ‘The household inventory as urban ‘theatre’ in late medieval Burgundy’